Notes from a Conference We Didn’t Attend Except in Spirit

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We wish we could have been there but it was impossible unless we could be beamed up from the Philippines to the U.S.   The conference was scheduled around the same time we were moving into our own space in Taguig.  Thank goodness for audio recordings that make its way to us almost instantly through email.

Since August of last year, Abot Tala has been a part of the Liberated Learners, a network of centers modeled after the North Star Self-Directed Learning for Teens.  Every year, the founders and staff meet, share experiences and lessons from running the same type of space where teens can direct their own education.  Adults are not there to tell them what to do or study, but to facilitate the process.

Last night, two of our members spoke with Catina as they were trying to put together their “story” to be used in our outreach efforts. One of them used a beautiful metaphor of a flower. She said that often she has felt as if she were like a flower trying to grow with a big rock on top. She has had to grow crooked and deformed to accommodate this rock. She feels Embark has simply, moved the rock allowing her to grow in the way she was always meant to.

So, my quest: Move the rock. Don’t be the rock.

                                             Andrea Cubelo-McKay, Founder                                                                                       Embark Center for Self-Directed Education

Being in Abot Tala almost every day these past weeks, struggling with the challenges, sometimes, I feel like the rock that has to be moved away.  Listening to the recordings and reading Ken Danford’s book are great reminders about why Abot Tala exists.  But the best reminders are the kids themselves.  When you talk to them and get to know them and know you are in the presence of precious souls.

Daniela Gonzalez, one of the guest mentors at Abot Tala took down these notes from the audio recordings:

  • Relationship, building trust, being part of the community is the most important element in supporting teens in what they want to do.
  • Mentoring is the service that parents value most.
  • Freedom comes with great responsibility.  Teens aren’t ready to take on that responsibility and need help with it through mentoring
  • Mentoring allows to have quick feedback from members regarding their social relationships and learning at the center (e.g. if someone is making them sad, if they don’t like one of their one-on-one learning sessions, etc.)
  • Being a mentor sometimes means repeating the same thing multiple times over many sessions before a teen considers it.
  • Teens feel valued when asked about the things they do that interests them (e.g. “why did you like that movie?” “what do you like about that game?” etc.)
  • Through mentoring we can help teens to have more agency in their lives.
  • Mentoring indirectly builds trust with the parents and the whole family.
  • For teens who say they will do X number of things and then don’t follow through, it’s a good idea to talk after a month or so during mentoring and say “Hey, so we have this action item here and it’s been four/five weeks and you’ve been saying you were going to do it but perhaps there’s something holding you back? Perhaps there’s something getting in the way.  Let’s analyze . . . “
  • Some kids need spontaneity and flexibility, others need structure. The “superpower” of the model is that it allows for both.

These are points which I highlighted:

  • Everyone is working on themselves to be better.
  • You are capable of more than what people have decided you’re capable of.
  • Let’s build this together because we don’t want this to go away.

 

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