Finding Sherman

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On the way to the Sequoia National Park, we stopped  by a lake with a dock for houseboats and fishing boats.  It was tempting to tarry but we had a date with General Sherman, the biggest living tree in terms of volume.  If you plan to go to Sequoia during the winter season, make sure you have snow chains because you’d be required even if it’s a warm sunny day and the snow is already melting.  The National Park Service is extra cautious and from the gate, you’d be asked to turn around to rent or buy the chains.   The cost of the chain lowers the farther from the gate you are.

Inside the park, we have lunch on the picnic grounds equipped with bear-proof trash cans and huge rocks perfect for clambering.   You hear the water rushing from the mountain tops and driving up the winding road with mini-waterfalls on the side, you feel the power of the sun melting the snow.

People are in awe of these stately trees that have been in existence for thousands of years. The Sequoias are soft to touch and it’s hard to imagine how sturdy they really are like people who have strengths hidden deep within their core although they seem softies on the outside.

After frolicking and getting wet in the snow, the kids are knocked out, tired in the car but when they wake up, we choose a picnic spot by the lake.  It employs a clever honesty system where you put the day fee of five dollars in an envelope and drop it in a metal box. You leave the stub on your dashboard.  There are picnic tables, grills, bathrooms, water and people go there mostly to launch their boats into the lake.  We’re trying out our camping mode and enjoy the night eating warm bowls of noodles.

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